ITINERARY

JULY 30: Arriving to Ashford, WA and Rainier National Park

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM JULY 30, 2010

YOUTUBE VIDEO OVERVIEW OF SUMMIT TRIP

9:00 am: Arrive to SEATAC Airport

 

JULY 31: Day 1 - Technical Training Day

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM JULY 31, 2010

8:00 - 6:00 p.m.: Meet at Rainier BaseCamp.

This day provides an intensive learning opportunity in a classroom setting. The preparatory class is a focused introduction to a variety of topics. This includes a detailed personal equipment discussion and gear check, instruction regarding Leave No Trace practices and environmental considerations, and a thorough discussion/demonstration regarding knots, anchors and crevasse rescue skills. This helps prepare us for our adventure on Mt. Rainier, and increases the likelihood of a safe, successful ascent of the mountain.

Our group intends to house ourselves at Whittaker's Bunkhouse in Ashford, WA.

 

AUGUST 1: Day 2 - The Mountaineering Day School

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM AUGUST 1, 2010

8:15 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.: Meet at Rainier BaseCamp.

Team assembles in preparation for the day. Please arrive dressed for hiking, packed with your Mountaineering Day School gear, and ready to go at 8:15 a.m.

Our Mountaineering Day School is spent training in the field on the lower slopes of Mt. Rainier. On this day, you are introduced to many skills, from the basic techniques of efficient mountain travel (rest-stepping and pressure breathing), various safety practices including use of helmets, harnesses, and avalanche transceivers, cramponing, roped travel, ice axe arrest practice, anchors and running belays, fixed line travel, and the basics of crevasse rescue.

Our group intends to house ourselves at Whittaker's Bunkhouse in Ashford, WA.

 

AUGUST 2 - 5: Days 3 Through 6 - The Emmons Climb

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM AUGUST 2, 2010

7:00 a.m.: Meet at Rainier BaseCamp.

Day 3 (August 2): After an initial team meeting at 7:00 a.m. a shuttle takes our group to the trailhead at the White River Campground (4,400 feet). Our climb leaves the White River Campground on a beautiful 3.3 mile hike through mature forests. As we move up towards camp we begin to work on the foundational skills that make us more efficient and capable climbers. These skills include pressure breathing and the rest step, dressing appropriately for the weather and workload, kicking steps and climbing in balance when on snow, eating and taking efficient rest breaks, and working on a pacing system that allows us to hike and climb all day. These skills will get us into camp feeling good and are important skills for any climber to possess. We will spend our first night on the mountain at Glacier Basin Camp at 6,000 feet. This camp is set at the very edge of the forest.

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM AUGUST 3, 2010

YOUTUBE VIDEO OF HIKING TO AND CAMPING BEYOND GLACIER BASIN

Day 4 (August 3): Shortly above our first camp we will be roping up to gain access to the Inter Glacier, and then climbing over the flanks of Steamboat Prow onto the heavily crevassed Emmons Glacier. As we make the ascent to our high camp (Camp Schurman, 9,440 feet), we continue to hone our new mountaineering techniques. Once at Camp Schurman, we have a great arena for the practice of additional skills, and then we will prep for our summit bid. Proper placement of snow and ice anchors, crevasse rescue simulations, and ice climbing can all be accomplished here.

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM AUGUST 4, 2010

Day 5 (August 4): Today we put it all together and make our attempt on the summit. The Emmons-Winthrop Glacier route climbs the northern edge of the largest glacier in the lower 48 states, the Emmons Glacier. The spectacular 35-degree central ramp of the glacier offers a corridor by which we are able to access the crevassed slopes of the upper mountain. We skillfully thread our way through these immense crevasses toward Columbia Crest, the true summit of Mt. Rainier!

The summit of Mount Rainier is spectacular. A large crater dominates the summit, with steam rising out of the cavernous summit vents. The bare ground near the summit can be warm to the touch. At 14,410 feet, Mt. Rainier is the highest point in Washington. After spending some time on top, we begin the descent to high camp. This takes about half the time of the ascent, and requires definite effort. (Be sure that your training specifically includes preparation for descending. This will help ensure that your ability to safely descend is not compromised.) Our group returns to Camp Schurman for the evening.

PHOTO GALLERY IMAGES FROM AUGUST 5, 2010

YOUTUBE VIDEO OF "RAINIER REAL - RAINIER'S NATURAL BEAUTY"

Day 6 (August 5): The final day of the program is spent descending our route from high camp, and returning to the trailhead. Our shuttle will then take the team to Rainier BaseCamp in Ashford. Plan on arriving back in Ashford in the late afternoon. After all the group gear is unpacked and checked in, we celebrate our adventure with a presentation of certificates.